Friday, 24 November 2017

Two AIHW obesity reports

Overweight and obesity in Australia: a birth cohort analysis.

Adults in 2014-15 were significantly more likely to be obese than adults of the same age 20 years earlier at almost any given age. At age 18-21, 15.2% of those born in 1994-1997 were obese, almost double the proportion of those born in 1974-1977 at the same age (8.0%). Children and adolescents in 2014-15 were also significantly more likely to be overweight or obese at ages 10-13 and 14-17 than those of the same age 20 years earlier.



A picture of overweight and obesity in Australia

This report provides an overview of overweight and obesity in Australia-a major public health issue that has significant health and financial costs. Almost one-quarter of children and two-thirds of adults are overweight or obese, and rates continue to rise, largely due to a rise in obesity, which cost the economy $8.6 billion in 2011-12.


Media release: Gen, X, Y and Z: Obesity risk higher for younger generations.

Infographic/Stats mat: An interactive insight into overweight and obesity in Australia.

Thursday, 23 November 2017

Work-related hospitalised injuries, Australia 2006-07 to 2013-14 [AIHW]

There were 617,755 hospitalised cases funded by workers' compensation in Australia in the period from 2006-07 to 2013-14, with 72% being male and 96% aged 15-64. Almost 38% of these cases were hospitalised primarily due to a musculoskeletal-related condition while 32% were hospitalised primarily due to injury and poisoning. There were 234,104 hospitalised cases reported as work related over this period, with 61% being funded by workers' compensation.

Download report: Work-related hospitalised injuries, Australia 2006-07 to 2013-14.

Hospital care for Australian sports injury 2012-13 [AIHW]

This report focuses on acute care services provided by hospitals for sports injuries treated in Australian hospitals in 2012-13. Cases of sports injury are examined in terms of the body region injured. Of the selected injury types, Head injury was the most common, accounting for 16% of all hospitalised sport related cases. Injury to the knee accounted for 12% of hospitalised sports injury.

Download report: Hospital care for Australian sports injury 2012-13.

Impact of physical inactivity as a risk factor for chronic conditions [AIHW]

This report details the impact of physical inactivity on disease burden in the Australian population. Results from this study suggest that prevention and intervention efforts may best be focused on sustained population-level increases in physical activity, by as little as 15 minutes each day, to avoid associated disease burden. It also highlights that health inequalities exist, with lower socioeconomic groups experiencing larger rates of disease burden due to physical inactivity.

Major findings include:

* Physical inactivity is responsible for 10–20% of burden for related diseases

* 2.6% of the total disease burden in 2011 was due to physical inactivity

* 1.7 times higher rate of physical inactivity burden in the lowest socioeconomic group compared with the highest

* When physical inactivity is combined with overweight and obesity the burden increases to 9%; equal to tobacco smoking

Download report: Impact of physical inactivity as a risk factor for chronic conditions.

Monday, 20 November 2017

Spatial variation in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women's access to 4 types of maternal health services

This report presents the findings of a project which assessed Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women's access to hospitals with public birthing services and 3 other types of maternal health services across Australia, then investigated possible high-level associations between access, maternal risk factors and birth outcomes.

Access to services

The study examined the geographic access of Indigenous women of child-bearing age (15–44) to 4 types of on-the-ground maternal health services: hospitals with a public birthing unit; Indigenous-specific primary health-care services (ISPHCSs); Royal Flying Doctor Service clinics; and general practitioners (GPs). Using 1 hour drive time boundaries around these locations and population counts from the 2011 Census at a range of geographic levels (SA2, remoteness, jurisdiction), the study found:

* approximately one-fifth (25,600 or 21%) of Indigenous women of child-bearing age lived outside a 1 hour drive time from the nearest hospital with a public birthing unit
* nearly all (97%) Indigenous women of child-bearing age had access to at least 1 type of maternal health service within a 1 hour drive time. The lowest levels of access were for women in Very remote and Remote areas, where 84% and 93%, respectively, had access to at least 1 type of service.
* Indigenous women of child-bearing age in Major cities, Inner regional and Outer regional areas had more types of services available to them within a 1 hour drive time than did women in more remote areas. Thus, they had more choice in which service they use.

Association with area-level maternal risk factor and birth outcomes

Examining possible associations between geographic accessibility to services, maternal risk factors and birth outcomes at the Indigenous Region level, the study found that poorer access to:

* GPs was associated with higher rates of pre-term birth and low birthweight
* ISPHCSs with maternal/antenatal services was associated with higher rates of smoking and low birthweight
* hospitals with public birthing units was associated with higher rates of smoking, pre-term birth and low birthweight
* at least 1 service was associated with higher smoking rates and higher rates of pre-term delivery and low birthweight.

Download report: Spatial variation in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women's access to 4 types of maternal health services

Thursday, 9 November 2017

Roadblocks in mental health care

Clinical factors stand in the way of better mental health care, according to new research led by Flinders. The research project led by Professor Eimear Muir-Cochrane, Chair of Nursing (Mental Health) at Flinders University, has found that despite best practice techniques being available to reduce or eliminate seclusion and restraint, national system-wide implementation is inconsistent.

The project, funded by the National Mental Health Commission, and conducted by the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses (ACMHN), reveals that clinical factors stand in the way of achieving a restraint-free environment in mental health care.

Read more at: https://indaily.com.au/news/local/2017/11/08/roadblocks-mental-health-care/

Greater support for mental health in the bush

THE rate of suicide is 66% higher in rural Australia compared to major cities, with farmers twice as likely to take their own lives than the general population. Per capita rural Medicare expenditure on mental health care is 60% of what it is in cities.

Member for Maranoa David Littleproud said distance was one barrier for those in the bush, which had now been removed.Mr Littleproud said a new telehealth initiative was available for people living in rural and remote areas, improving access to psychological services."I often hear travel times and the fear of others knowing you're receiving help stops people from putting up their hand for assistance - so that's why we've introduced this new service to improve mental health access,” he said.

See more at: https://www.warwickdailynews.com.au/news/greater-support-for-mental-health-in-the-bush/3260006/

Thursday, 26 October 2017

Trends in injury deaths, Australia 1999-00 to 2011-12 [AIHW]

This report focuses on trends in deaths due to injury and poisoning that occurred over the period 1999-00 to 2011-12.

The age-standardised rate of injury deaths decreased from 55.4 to 47.2 deaths per 100,000 between 1999-00 and 2004-05 and changed little after that. Rates of injury deaths involving transport injury and homicide declined from 1999-00 to 2009-10, while rates for most other external cause groups fluctuated over this period. Rates for suicide deaths declined from 1999-00 until 2004-05 and remained relatively steady thereafter.

Rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were generally at least twice as high as rates for non-Indigenous Australians over the period from 2001-02 to 2011-12.

Download report: Trends in injury deaths, Australia 1999-00 to 2011-12

Trends in hospitalisations due to falls by older people [AIHW]

This report presents trends in fall related hospital care for people aged 65 and older from 2002-03 to 2012-13. There was a decrease in the rate of hip fractures due to falls (-2% per year) between 2002-03 and 2012-13. In contrast, falls resulting in head injuries increased at a particularly high rate (7% per year).

Download report: Trends in hospitalisations due to falls by older people, Australia 2002-03 to 2012-13

Tuesday, 24 October 2017

Australian health expenditure-demographics and diseases [AIHW]

In 2012-13, hospital admitted patient expenditure was estimated at $45.0 billion, and accounted for almost one third (31%) of total health expenditure. Expenditure for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people was estimated at $2.1 billion. Expenditure was highest in older age groups, but grew for all age groups from 2004-05 to 2012-13 (45.5%). Cardiovascular diseases were the largest disease contributor at $5.0 billion (11.1%), followed by injuries at $4.1 billion (9.0%).

Download report: Australian health expenditure-demographics and diseases: hospital admitted patient expenditure 2004-05 to 2012-13

Friday, 20 October 2017

5 new AIHW Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 reports

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has released 5 new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 reports todawhich can be accessed by clicking below.

These reports give the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in each state are faring according to various measures of health status and outcomes, determinants of health, and health system performance.Indicators are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework. The reports highlight the main areas of improvement, and continuing concern.


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: New South Wales.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: Queensland.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: South Australia.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: Victoria.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: Western Australia.

Monday, 16 October 2017

National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Mental Health and Social and Emotional Wellbeing 2017-2023

The Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet have launched the new National strategic framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people's mental health and social and emotional wellbeing 2017-2023. The framework sets out a comprehensive and culturally appropriate stepped care model that is applicable to both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander specific and mainstream health services. It will help guide and support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health policy and practice over the next 5 years, and be an important resource for policy makers, advocates, service providers, clients, consumers and researchers.

The framework is designed to complement the Fifth national mental health and suicide prevention plan and contribute to the vision of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health plan 2012-2023.

The framework was developed under the auspices of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Advisory Group, co-chaired by Professor Pat Dudgeon and Professor Tom Calma AO.

National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples' Mental Health and Social and Emotional Wellbeing 2017-2023.

"Head to Health": Australia’s new digital mental health gateway

Australia's new digital mental health gateway, Head to Health, is now live. Head to Health connects people to online and phone mental health services appropriate for their individual needs.

Head to Health will help people to take control of their mental health, at a time and place convenient to them, complementing or in place of face-to-face services. It supports people seeking help - either for themselves or someone they care about.

Head to Health is not only helpful when seeking support for a mental health condition, it also provides information about staying mentally well for every Australian.

Services and resources listed on Head to Health are delivered by Australia's mental health service providers including the Butterfly Foundation, CanTeen, beyondblue and Kids Helpline. They include free or low-cost apps, online support communities, online courses, and phone services that are private and secure.

Head to Health was developed in collaboration with the community, the mental health sector and the Department of Health.

Visit Head to Health for more information.

Building a digital mental health gateway was a key part of the Government's response to the National Mental Health Commission's Contributing Lives, Thriving Communities – National Review of Mental Health Programmes and Services.

Friday, 13 October 2017

New report and web report: Mental Health Services [AIHW]

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has released a report and web report:

Mental health services-in brief report and Mental Health Services in Australia web report

Mental health services: in brief 2017 provides an overview of data about the national response of the health and welfare system to the mental health care needs of Australians.

Sections that are being updated in the online Mental Health Services Australia pages are
* Mental health services provided by general practitioners
* Mental health service provided in emergency departments
* Community mental health care
* Residential mental health care
* Overnight admitted mental health care
* Same day admitted mental health care
* Restrictive practices

Media release: Access to mental health services through Medicare on the rise with almost 1 in 10 Australians accessing government-subsidised services.

Download report: Mental health services-in brief

Download web report: Mental Health Services in Australia.

Wednesday, 11 October 2017

50 years since citizenship: successes and challenges in Indigenous health

This year, Australia celebrates 50 years since the 1967 referendum, when the nation voted to amend the constitution to allow the federal government to create laws for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and include them in the census. The latest issue of Public Health Research & Practice reflects on some of the changes that have occurred since the referendum, particularly with respect to progress in improving Indigenous health outcomes.

Articles in this issue include an interview with the Indigenous Health Minister, Ken Wyatt, about the policy and politics of improving Indigenous health; a perspective on the Indigenous smoking epidemic and what stage it is at; an article on research priorities in Indigenous cancer and an 'In practice' article describing a NSW Health program established to strengthen the Aboriginal public health workforce.

Non-themed papers look at trends in fall-related ambulance use and hospitalisation among older adults; an overview of child injury surveillance capabilities in NSW; and the validity of self-reported medication use compared with the gold standard, pharmaceutical claims data.

Link to full issue

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